Porthos | The Wine Insiders
Jordan Winery
jordan_label.jpg Great wines are invariably associated with great vineyards. The interaction of climate, soil and husbandry impart, through the grapes, a unique character to the wine. When successful geologist and wine connoisseur Tom Jordan first came to Northern California in the early 1970s, he was quick to appreciate the potential apparent in the Alexander Valley for a premium vineyard and winery.



In 1972, Tom Jordan acquired 275 acres of prune orchards for conversion to vineyards, plus 1300 acres of rolling oak woodlands as a site for the future winery facility as well as an informal preserve for deer, wild turkey, coyotes, waterfowl, and other wildlife.



In the case of areas selected for planting vines, nature required the help of art and experience, so the land was re-graded to enhance soil drainage. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and - five years later - Chardonnay grapes were planted. In due course, a winery, inspired by southwestern French country architecture, was built on an oak-studded knoll and completed just in time for the first vintage, that of 1976.



From the first, winemaking at Jordan has integrated new-world technology and old-world artistry to complement the unique natural qualities of the grapes. Created under the tutelage of the legendary André Tchelistcheff, the first vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon established a suppleness and delicacy that was uncommon in California. Working alongside André in those early years was the present winemaker, Rob Davis. Many of the vineyard workers who originally planted the estate vines still care for them today. This continuity assures the consistency of style and elegance so typical of all Jordan wines.



Tom Jordan has always believed that wine making should be a logical conclusion to the all-important work done in the vineyards: Art and nature should become one. His instincts proved to be right. Jordan wines from the Alexander Valley quickly gained an international reputation for excellence, and continue to maintain that pre-eminent position.